I feel like we don’t talk enough about Star Trek here at The Collective, so my pick for this week’s villain is not the over-used Khan, but rather a TNG villain: the Queen of the Borg.

I chose this particular villain because 1) she has always been the ‘Trek villain with the highest creep factor for me and 2) the Borg Collective are probably the most unlike every other Trek villain, because of their lack of humanity and collectivity. (Grammar sidethought: Is it the “Borg is” considering they share a mindset? hmmm)

Property of Paramount Pictures
Property of Paramount Pictures

Her Designation

You imply disparity where none exists. She is the beginning, the end, the one who is many.

Distinguishing Traits:

The Borg share a collective consciousness, and the Queen “brings order to chaos.” She alone of the Borg shows personality, emotion, and the ability to use persuasion and psychology on those she chooses to assimilate.

History of Assimilation:

Property of Paramount Pictures
Property of Paramount Pictures

The Queen was assimilated as a child, probably around the age of 7 or 8. Although the Queen was the “leader” of the Borg and exhibited qualities that the drones did not, she was not an individual. The hive mind of the Borg prevented her from truly embracing a unique personality; she has often been compared to the “queen” of a hive of insects.

When Captain Jean Luc Picard was captured by the Borg, the Queen assimilated him into the not-quite-drone, Locutus. She intended him to be a consort for her (of sorts), since the more human part of her could still feel loneliness. Later, when the android Data was captured by the Queen, she attempted to assimilate him in a similar fashion, but together Picard and Data killed the Queen by fracturing her cybernetic spinal cord, thereby destroying her connection to the Collective.

Whether your geek is an Anglophile, a Trekkie or a member of Loki’s Army, here is The Collectiva Diva’s Christmas gift giving guide for the the chicest geek you know.

Keep it Real

The important thing to remember when shopping for a nerd is authenticity. Unless “knock off” is a term you want tossed around your Christmas tree, work on making sure the items you pick out are either a) kitschy and cute (ala Esty) or legit merch from the higher-ups. Networks like the BBCA and the WB have their own merchandise shops and pages such as ThinkGeek.com collect great nerd gear all on one website.

Official BBC Doctor Who bathrobes, $37-60
Official BBC Doctor Who bathrobes, $37-60

Your arguments are invalid.
Your arguments are invalid.

So Benedict Cumberbatch. Where do I begin? It’s different, with Benny. He’s been creeping slowly into my veins since I first saw him bumbling around with Martin Freeman on Sherlock. Suddenly, I’m searching him on YouTube, watching interviews and red carpet appearances and correcting my friends and family when they pronounce his name wrong. Then, I’ve seen every film, commercial, sitcom, television series he’s been in. That quirky smile, the ginger hair, the voice that sounds like a jaguar purring inside of a cello, the fact that he doesn’t take himself too seriously, that he wants kids and every leading lady he works with ends up gushing about Benedict and what a great dad he will be and Ben is just so sweet. The fan girls (and boys), we swoon over him in an overly dramatic, teen angsty sort of way, regardless if we hold PhD’s in Comparative Literature or not. The thing is, Benedict is a legitimately talented actor not to mention his bloody gorgeousness sneaks up on you. He’s my tall, lanky alien boy that I just want to keep in a gilded cage so he can read Keats to me as we drink tea in the late afternoon (well that was specific).