In the past, the Collective blog has addressed issues such as nerd privilege and the way that sometimes being in a fandom can hurt us. Today, however, I’m presenting an issue that extends to every user of the Internet: cyberbullying.

This is not something that only affects teens. This is not only the title of an ABC Family movie. This is not a myth.

Cyberbullying—sometimes known as cyberharassment or cyberstalking—carries much of the same definition as traditional bullying. Dan Olweus, a Norwegian researcher who is recognised as the leading scholar on bullying, defines cyberbullying as “bullying performed via electronic means such as mobile/cellphones or the internet” (1). ‘Traditional’ bullying, he defines as “using three components: (1) aggressive behavior with negative actions, (2) a pattern of behavior over time, and (3) an imbalance of power or strength” (2). We most frequently associate these actions with children and adolescents, but this is not always the case.