Katniss is already a hero in District 12.
Katniss is already a hero in District 12.

Grrl Power

According to Lee Edwards in his book, Psyche as Hero (1984) “By the beginning of the twentieth century, novelists seem readier to abandon the project of entrapping the female heroic character and begin the task of inventing maneuvers whereby she can break out of familial, sexual, and social bondage into an altered and appropriate world” (16). Suzanne Collins’ “Girl on Fire” is a heroic alternative to limited female archetypes bound inextricably to traditionally assigned gender roles. Katniss is not tied to a matriarchal role, in fact, she cannot and will not bare children until social change is achieved in Panem. Readers encounter a love triangle of sorts, yet it is not central to the action. Katniss cannot settle into any role comfortably until she achieves social and spiritual growth and her journey is over. On her quest, the female hero must risk violating social norms regarding gender roles to fully realize her heroic qualities. Katniss must “incorporate change into [her] private life [and then] move with confidence into a newly constituted world” (Edwards 16).

#11 Nightmare in Silver

Written by Neil Gaiman

This is the final installment of the “11 of 11” series and I am a bit sad. I began this series when I heard that Matt Smith was officially leaving DW, and now that it is almost November and with less than a month to the 50th anniversary episode of Who, well, my feels, guys. My feels.

Miss you already, Matt.
Miss you already, Matt.

I don’t want Matt to go! As a newly inducted Wholigan, this is the first time I’ve lost a Doctor on the linear time line. If you’ve know my “New to Who” story, you know that I didn’t watch Doctor Who in order, I jumped around in the series, finding episodes that entertained me, all the while desperately trying not to fall in love with the show. It was an unexpected love affair, and it wasn’t until River Song showed up in series 6 that I realized I’d inadvertently become a Whovian. I love David Tennant as Ten, don’t get me wrong. I, too, swoon over the fangirl favorite and adore every episode in which he sexily runs around, fighting nefarious aliens, falling in love with Rose, showing off to Martha and laughing with Donna. I cry when I watch “The End of Time” and never want to see him go. But Eleven. Eleven is the Doctor who fell in love with River Song. He is the Doctor who laughs away the pain of being Ten, Nine and the others, while remaining immensely powerful. He is still the Timelord Victorious, but with a bow tie and new best friends. Eleven never forgot life as Ten, he just refused to fall into a pattern of despair and self loathing. Eleven allowed himself to fall in love with River, to create a family in the Ponds and who, when that family is finally lost, discovered something to live for in the mysteries of the Universe and of Clara Oswald. Matt Smith has played Eleven’s ridiculously huge story arc fearlessly, with finesse that makes the role look easy. He goes from dark and intense to silly and childish in a matter of seconds, never afraid to utilize emotion, physical humor or emotional pain to drive the character forward. Peter Capadli definitely has bigger-on-the-inside shoes to fill. No one thought Matt could do it, and then suddenly, the show is an American hit, a internet sensation and new audiences across the globe are falling in love with time travel and the TARDIS, as Britain has been for years. But Matt Smith is moving on, Whovians. There’s no doubt he will do well after Who. He is young, attractive (in a Timelord-y sorta way) and has range. This episode, Nightmare in Silver, proves it. So, goodbye Eleven. You will be missed, mourned and meme-ed for many years to come.

Episode S07xE13

AKA The Episode Eleven Kinda Loses His Mind

So, a new threat in the form of the oldest threat to humankind: disease. There is an aggressive flu strain that is killing seemingly healthy members of the jail-tribe almost instantly. With no way to fight against simple viruses or infection, the group has to resort to Dark Age methods of guessing who will be next and then separating the infected from the group. This plot point reminds audiences that in the zombie apocalypse, health care is pretty much nonexistent and, while tribe members have been lucky not to get sick (except Andrea in S03E01) lack of proper medicine, vaccines and sterilization can be deadly.

Poor Patrick didn't get much on-screen time without blood covering his face.
Poor Patrick didn’t get much on-screen time without blood covering his face.

Episode:

S04xE02 “Infected”

You might have heard me squee across the internet when I realized I would get to write about Season 6. The French Mistake! Huzzah! This is one of the few episodes I watch over and over again–just to have a laugh and to marvel at the pure joy that is Supernatural. These guys really love to mess with us, don’t they, fandom? The Collective blog is on a meta roll, and I figured I’d round it out with this epic alternate reality in which Sam and Dean are something called a Jensen Ackles and a Jared Padalecki. They also work with some douchy Twitter troll named Misha. Oh, and Sam is married to fake-Ruby. Ya. This is gonna be good.

"The French Mistake" -  Jensen Ackles as Dean playing Jensen Ackles, Jared Padalecki as Sam playing Jared Padalecki and Misha Collins as Castiel playing Misha Collins playing Castiel in SUPERNATURAL on The CW set.
“The French Mistake” – Jensen Ackles as Dean playing Jensen Ackles, Jared Padalecki as Sam playing Jared Padalecki and Misha Collins as Castiel playing Misha Collins playing Castiel in SUPERNATURAL on The CW set.