the walking dead season 5

So5xE11: “The Distance”

We have come across all types in the Walking Dead universe, from cannibals to crazies, but no one as clean and downright suspicious as Aaron. The Tribe is weary and in desperate need of redemption from the foot travel lifestyle they’ve been leading since the prison was overrun. Starvation, dehydration, shelter and safety are basic needs that they struggle to meet, and what Aaron represents (peace, comfort, friendship) feels foreign and difficult to comprehend for Tribe members. Trust and hope are hard emotions to wield in a post-apocalyptic society in which individuals are often out only for themselves. For the Tribe, decisions have to be made and barriers must be broken in order for everyone to survive.

Spoilers ahead, Sweetie…

the walking dead season 5

So5xE10: “Them”

Post-apocalyptic life has never been more clearly defined as in this episode of The Walking Dead. For the living, it is heartbreak, hunger, loneliness and fear, punctuated by moments of reprieve that include family and friends. For the Tribe, the basic physiological needs must be met in order to move forward on their journey to Washington D.C., while psychological issues threaten to tear the group apart. After the recent losses to the Tribe, what will it take to keep them together, sane and safe?

Spoilers ahead, Sweetie…

the walking dead season 5

So5xE09: “What Happened and What’s Going On”

The Tribe is back together but inevitably broken after the losing Beth in Slabtown. With not enough time to grieve, the group is forced to continue moving in order to find food and safety. It seems the troubles of the Tribe are, once again, focused on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, with physiology and safety being of the utmost concern. This episode reiterates that things go “the way [they] have to, the way [they] were always going to”, but what does that mean for the members of our tribe? Will they find shelter? Will the group retain their emotional fortitude to continue roaming the lower United States in search for friends, family and a home? Are there such things in a post-apocalyptic world?

spoilers ahead sweetie…

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S01xE05: The Iron Ceiling

This week, Agent Carter addresses the value of women and the power they wield, even in a society which doesn’t fully acknowledge that they possess it. While sneaking across the “Iron Curtain” is easy for Peggy, breaking the “glass ceiling” at the SSR isn’t as simple. Gender limits Peggy to “suitable” office work and is a means of discrimination and abuse at the whims of her coworkers. For Peggy to succeed at the SSR, she must not only excel at her job, but also gain the support and acceptance of her male coworkers.

Spoilers Ahead, Sweetie…

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S01xE04: “The Blitzkrieg Button”

So far in Agent Carter, we have explored expectations of women in 1950s society, especially how Peggy navigates through the stereotypes placed on her because of gender. While some reviewers seem to have gotten tired of being reminded of Peggy’s feminism, I find it refreshing that Marvel has taken the realities of discrimination and brought them to the forefront of this hero’s tale. Peggy cannot escape her female-ness, nor should she want to. In addition to sexism, the show also addresses disability discrimination within the character of Daniel Sousa. Regardless of the acts of valor he committed to earn his war wounds, Sousa cannot reverse his disability and the stigma that it holds. Although these two agents (as viewers can note) are closest to solving the mysteries of Stark and Leviathan, they are both berated, disregarded and disrespected in the workplace. This treatment of Peggy and Sousa within the “normal” masculine sphere allows viewers a glimpse into the misogynistic value system that allows for acceptable societal discrimination and harassment.

Spoilers Ahead, Sweetie…

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S01xE03: “Time and Tide”

Agent Carter premiered its third episode to lower-than-usual second week ratings, but the heroic journey of Peggy Carter continues to grow in terms of intricacies, revealing new characters and relationships of interest. With the mysterious “Leviathan” organization pushing the narrative forward, Peggy continues to navigate between life as an under-appreciated superspy and neighbor/friend to those who do not know her secret. While helping Howard Stark find his missing weapons and giving all the credit to the boys at the SSR is a disappointing circumstance for the woman who helped Captain America “defeat” Hydra, Peggy’s journey is less about recognition and more focused on breaking stereotypes placed upon her by the patriarchy.

Spoilers Ahead, Sweetie…

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S01xE01: “Pilot” & S01xE02: “Bridge and Tunnel”

The Marvel Cinematic Universe has proven expansive both on the big screen and small, with no signs of stopping (until 2019, at least). With Phase 2 in progress and audiences eagerly awaiting Phase 3, Agent Carter comes to the small screen as an 8-part mini-series to help unify the stories of S.H.I.E.L.D. and the Avengers, with Peggy Carter, Howard Stark, the Howling Commandos and other familiar faces (I hope) to bring the narrative to life. In terms of discussion, I’ve decided to go meta and look at what this show brings to the larger Marvel Cinematic Universe and the importance of Peggy Carter. I am going to start with Peggy’s place in the MCU as a female hero, and move out from there as  the show continues. I don’t claim to be a Marvel expert or the end-all-be-all of MCU knowledge, so please, cut me some slack. The Universe is so large and covers so much information, there are bound to be readers who know much, MUCH more about it than I do. I’m just a fan, writing about something I love, trying to wrap my head around this amazing franchise.

Spoilers Ahead, Sweetie…