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Since the announcement that BBC’s Sherlock would have its very own convention, fans have been aflutter (the Collective team included). Sherlocked: The Official Sherlock Convention is taking place in London on the weekend of April 24-26, 2015. A second con will take place in the States at a later date.

So why are so many Sherlockians unhappy?

Well, I’ve got a list. It’s a short list, I grant you, but an important one.

1.) Sherlocked is expensive.

Like hold-up-let-me-sell-my-kidney expensive.

We kid you not.

Why is it so pricey, you ask? It’s confusing, I know. At first glance, the one-day and weekend tickets look similar to other conventions. A standard one-day pass is £29 (approximately $43, depending on the rate of exchange). That isn’t vastly different from other conventions that take place in London, such as MCM Comic Con or London Super Comic Con. The catch is that a one-day ticket (or even a weekend pass) to Sherlocked doesn’t guarantee you much of anything.

Reinventing Sherlock Holmes: The Transmedia Co-Construction by and for Fan Communities

Original illustrations by Sidney Paget for Doyle's "Final Problem"
Original illustrations by Sidney Paget for Doyle’s “Final Problem” (1893)

The adventures of Sherlock Holmes continue to fascinate audiences, regardless of the fact that the author of the original text, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, has been dead for 84 years. Doyle penned a total of 4 novels and 56 short stories containing the beloved Holmes over a period of 40 years, the 8-year long “Great Hiatus” between The Final Problem (1893) and The Hounds of Baskerville (1901) notwithstanding. According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the protagonist Sherlock Holmes is “’the most-portrayed movie character’, with more than 70 actors having played the part in at least 200 films” (Fox 1). In the last ten years, there have been numerous movies, books, and television series’ devoted to reinventing Sherlock Holmes, each one aimed at helping audiences find value in the historical character while simultaneously attempting to entice newer, younger consumers to participate in fan communities based on said character. For purposes of this “Transformative Fandom” series, I will take this concept a step further. According to the Archive of Our Own website for transformative fan works, there are currently a total of (I’ve updated this number 4 times in 1 week) 59,761 texts, pictures, videos and podfics uploaded and tagged with the term “Sherlock Holmes”. The characters of Holmes and Watson, as created by Doyle, are in the public domain, which means anyone can use them without permission, the caveat being that works only include the specific qualities of these characters as defined by the author in his texts published before 1923. For writers, artists and filmmakers, this means commercial adaptations can be made (mostly) without fear of copyright infringement, as long as the features of the characters are explicitly early canon or, conversely, unique. The Consulting Detective has enamored readers for over a hundred years, but with only 60 original stories written by Doyle, fans take it upon themselves to explore, in detail, the universe surrounding Sherlock, while others enjoy filling in the blanks of our beloved character’s existence with imagined cases, love interests and encounters that Doyle never anticipated. While neither community is necessarily exclusive or superior, both have specific goals and characteristics that assist in the co-creation of Sherlock Holmes via multiple media sources.

This week for our Villains of Note series, we will play a little game with one of my all time favorite villains, James Moriarty from a little BBC series entitled Sherlock. Moriarty, the arch-nemesis of Sherlock Holmes and England’s most prized consulting criminal.

You Know Him As:

 James Moriarty, The World’s Only Consulting Criminal, Molly’s boyfriend Jim, Richard Brooks, the Storyteller

Honey, You Should See Him In:

The Crown Jewels, impeccable suit, goofy smile

Name of the Game:

James Moriarty is the arch-nemesis to Sherlock Holmes and honey, he is not your average bad guy. Just as Sherlock began solving crimes at a young age, so Moriarty began committing them, starting with the murder of Carl Powers in 1989, a case which the underage Sherlock failed to get the police to investigate. Mori lets his crazy show a bit when we first meet him (turn who into shoes??) but decides to let Sherlock live to play another day, and thus the madman works his way up to Reichenbach and the top of St. Bart’s. Moriarty expertly weaves a web of deceit that instills doubt into those that once believed in Sherlock Holmes, and sets the detective up to either kill himself of watch his only 4 friends in the world (Molly, Lestrade, Mrs. Hudson and John) die. While Sherlock outsmarts Mori by faking his own death, Moriarty may still be a step ahead of us all. This villain seems to get the last word fairly often, but, when his image shows up on all the media outlets as a meme, it isn’t just Sherlock who doesn’t know what to think. Will Moriarty be back to terrorize his favorite target or have we all been duped once again?

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If money wasn’t an issue, what would you wear for Halloween?

Me? I’d pay someone to paint me entirely blue, Mystique-style.

Every year, I am continually fascinated (and amused) by the costumes donned by the rich and famous. Some actors seem to be tired of costumes and opt for simpler ideas, but others fully embrace the “Wear whatever the hell you want” atmosphere of All Hallows’ Eve.

Here are some of my favorite costumes from Halloween 2013. You may notice a tendency for geeky costumes.

Miranda Lambert as The Good Witch of Oz

I want to skip the yellow brick road with Mrs. Blake Shelton.

Adam Baldwin as…Himself? (Special Guest Star: Nathan Fillion‘s Tweet Response)

Nathan Fillion, the reigning Geek King of Twitter, gets one-upped by his previous Firefly co-star. (You don’t know how much it kills me inside to write “previous.” Browncoats unite! And wear a Jayne hat)