As you read this, I am on my way to New Zealand, completing the most sacred of my nerd pilgrimages: a journey to Middle-Earth. J.R.R. Tolkien’s creations are the closest to my heart, and since I am visiting the land of Elves and Hobbits, I thought I’d share with you some of the most striking scenes from the films, so that you can share my adventure with me in a small way. So, without ado, forth Eorlingas!

I don't own this edit.

Mae govannen, Collectors.

Although a majority of our writing focuses on comics, television, and film, the fandom that is nearest and dearest to my heart is Middle-earth. Today, we celebrate what is widely known as Hobbit Day, called such because it is the birthday for Tolkien’s two most famous protagonists: Bilbo and Frodo Baggins. If you’re secretly a Hobbit, or just really really really wish that Middle-earth was real, here’s a few ways to celebrate your favorite Bagginses in style. 

I was a peculiar child. Every Christmas season, instead of begging my parents for new dolls, princess tiaras, or a pony, I’d always write down “books” at the top of my Christmas list. To my eternal disappointment, every year my mother gave me stuff I needed: a new coat or shoes, a new dress for church, or the ever-dreaded socks. My mother doesn’t read for pleasure and never understood my fascination with words. “They’re not real,” she’d tell me when I told her about Captain Ahab’s white whale or Beth’s death in Little Women, “Why do you care so much?”

Twenty years later, that question still haunts me. Why do I care so much? Why do I cry for fictional characters? Why invest myself so much in a world that’s not real?

I blame my father.

I was seven-years-old the first time I read The Hobbit. Although my mother was unwilling to indulge my obsession for fiction, my father did. I had tossed aside The Chronicles of Narnia and The Little House on the Prairie series. I read things like The Hunchback of Notre Dame and The Three Musketeers, but at the age of 7 I didn’t understand them, nor did I want to. One Christmas, my father handed me a crudely wrapped present. “Don’t tell your mother,” he whispered.

‘Quel re, my dear collectibles. In celebration of MartinFreemanthe premiere of The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug later this week, I’ve decided to unofficially make The Collective blog hobbitized (translation: The Collectiva Diva and the Collected Canadian have no part in my obsession…for now).

Today’s focus: Middle-earth fashion. Since the release of LotR: FotR twelve years ago (wow I feel old), the world has been inundated with Tolkienish clothes, accessories, knibknobs and whatsamacallits. Here are some of my favorites, and, as a bonus, they also make excellent holiday presents (hint hint).

  • The Lord of the Rings My Precious t-shirt $25.00
    Precious not included.

     

  • The One Ring skirt, custom-made $58.94, RoobyLane on etsy.com

    For the fashionable Dark Lord

With all the “Dick” jokes we get during S7, it is refreshing to get a dose of girl power and with that, a character that isn’t trying to sex up one of our boys. Instead, Charlie Bradbury reflects some of the cooler women of the Supernatural fandom. We’re not all like Becky, Moose! In this episode, we meet Charlie, and with her hacker skills, video game/role playing obsessions, Lord of the Rings references, and a quick wit that keeps even Dean Winchester guessing, I was smitten with her as soon as she started snooping through her boss’ (Dick Roman, king Leviathan) files, after consulting the Hermione Granger bobble head for advice, or course.

Felicia Day as Charlie Bradbury.
Felicia Day as Charlie Bradbury, Defender of All Things Good.