I don’t remember the first time I watched Star Wars: A New Hope. I must have been five or six years old, and I was almost definitely shown the film by my father while my mother was out of the house. It started a lifelong passion for space operas, lightsabers, and princesses who don’t need rescuing. My father, one of the original Star Wars fanboys (he’s very proud that he stood in line for hours back in 1977 to see Ep IV), even allowed my brothers and I to ditch school one day in order to see a rerelease of the original trilogy in cinemas.

Long story short: I grew up on Star Wars, and if there’s one thing my father taught me when The Phantom Menace was released in 1999, it was that the Originals were always meant to be watched before the prequels. Boom. End of discussion.

by the Collectress

Since the 41st anniversary of Star Wars has just come and gone, Carrie Fisher has once again settled on my mind (okay so she’s always on my mind). Carrie was an impressive lady who was very honest with her struggles with bipolar disorder and addiction. And from that honesty, there are a few valuable lessons we should learn.