By the Collected Canadian

“Find what you’re afraid of most and go live there.”
Chuck Palahniuk, Invisible Monsters

The Collective had the fortunate opportunity of attending “A Legacy of Evil: Creating DC Villains” panel at this year’s WonderCon, moderated by John Kourounis (DC Daily Co-Host) and featuring masterminds Scott Snyder (Justice League, Dark Nights: Metal, Batman), Josh Williamson (Nailbiter, Justice League vs. Suicide Squad), Cecil Castellucci (Female Furies, The Changing Girl), Joëlle Jones (Lady Killer, Catwoman), and Adam Glass (Suicide Squad, Teen Titans). Are villains as villainous as they seem? Here are some things we learned about crafting these vile-but-valuable characters.

Beloved readers, this is my last article for The Collective this month, and in continuing my celebration of all things fandom and LGBTQA Pride, I’ve compiled a list (with special thanks to some awesome Twitter followers) of the most kick-ass LGBTQ+ couples in the comic verses.

It’s been a long, slow road to getting the LGBTQ+ community representation in comics that was more than subtext and not edited out of the finished product (as was the case for many characters). As a child, I probably couldn’t tell you the name of one gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender character, and now I’m having a difficult time narrowing down this list to less than ten (Iceman, Catwoman, Batwoman, Constantine, Northstar…etc.). This list was inspired by the immense popularity of #GiveCaptainAmericaABoyfriend, and also because, for me, everything this month is about Pride.

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Midnighter and Apollo (DC Comics)

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Introduced in 1998, Midnighter and Apollo have often been hailed as characters that parallel Batman and Superman, but Midnighter is a bit more sociopathic, and both are a bit more foul-mouthed. Even more notable is that they were one of the first openly gay couples to exist in the DC Comics verse. Unlike other comic characters who came out after years in the closet, and many of their stories depicting struggling with their sexuality, Midnighter and Apollo’s sexualities were a part of their comic depictions from the beginning, eventually marrying and adopting a daughter together, making them a badass gay superhero couple with a family.

(And yes, I know all about what happened in the 2015 Midnighter solo comics and it is, as this blogger says, “a copout.” Midnight & Apollo 5ever.)

If you’ve followed me on any of my social media accounts over the past five months, you’ve probably seen me complain about latest cosplay endeavor: Harley Quinn. Now, HQ is one of the most popular costumes at comic and pop culture conventions (and this is just as true at the conventions I’ve attended in London as well as the States), and I almost felt that it was a rite of passage as a burgeoning cosplayer to pay homage to one of the most recognizable comic characters.

So after planning, fabricating, cursing, and crying for almost a year, I first wore my HQ outfit to WonderCon 2016, and I learned a few things about cosplaying such a famous character, such as…