By The Damsel

If the Collective stands for anything, it’s for the 3 F words: Fangirling, Feelings, and Feminism – and the convention we visited this week end has all those things in spades. We went to GeekGirlCon in Seattle and I am here to deliver the scoop. This was my third or fourth time at this con, and I was thrilled to see how it has continued to grow (I estimate it’s at least tripled in size since I first attended)!

It’s that time of year again, friends, when we start to scrape together funds to attend fan conventions in the new year. In 2014, I gave you 5 California conventions I was dying to attend, and even got the chance to go to a few. In 2015, I am expanding my horizons and sharing with you 5 fan conventions across the United States that are well worth the travel. When it comes to attending fan conventions, the sooner you know what you’re looking for, the better. It’s best to think of fees such as hotel, transportation, cosplay and food as well as entrance cost and spending cash before the actual date, so as to get a head start on purchasing items in advance and not shock your wallet too badly.

If you’re interested in attending one of the cons on the list below, click on the links, visit the pages and book your time NOW, before tickets are gone. Enjoy!

xoxo The Collectiva Diva

Follow me on Twitter @collectivadiva or Tumblr and dive into the fandom rabbit hole with me.

Dragon Con

 

What: The largest multi-media, popular culture convention focusing on science fiction & fantasy, gaming, comics, literature, art, music, and film in the universe.

When: September 4-7, 2015

Where: Atlanta, GA

How Much: $100 for Dragon Con Membership

 

geek girl con

Guest Post by Jessica Mason

 

Pros and Cons

Fan conventions are funny things: they look different from inside. It’s actually much easier as an outsider observer to notice trends and take in everything about a con. For instance, I felt like I knew much less about all the panels at SDCC 2014 because I was too busy racing through the San Diego Convention Center and surrounding climes to keep up with Twitter and Tumblr and all the news that was emerging. In a way, that’s what can make a con fun. You are completely enclosed in your little world. There are usually too many people taking up bandwidth to make actually readings tweets and tumblr feasible, and the reception is always crappy, so you get to exist in this nice bubble. You hang out with your fellow fans, make friends, stand in long lines, forget to eat, squee and generally enjoy your time fangirling. And that was to some extent my experience at Geek Girl Con 2014 in Seattle over the 11th and 12th of October, except the real world’s very ugly head kept finding ways to butt in.

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Guest Post by Jessica Mason

There’s a moment, I think all of us self-identified geeks know it, when you walk into your first con and think: I have finally found my people. Where once you existed in isolation, able to share your passions with a few anonymous faces on line, suddenly you’re among other, actual, living, breathing, nerds. The thing about you that had to be hidden – your nerdiness – is something that is shared with this mass of people and celebrated. The only thing comparable I can think of was my first time stepping into a gay pride festival, fresh off of coming out. It was so welcoming and so much fun, and I was indeed suddenly so proud to be myself. Cons are like that. The moment when you’re walking down the street and see the first person dressed as Poison Ivy adjusting their bodice or Darth Vader in the coffee shop, and you know it: you’re home.

I felt that moment profoundly the first time I attended Geek Girl Con in Seattle in August of 2012. GGC was in its second year, just getting its feet wet, and it was still an amazing experience. As I roamed the aisles full of crocheted Avengers, independent game developers, geek community organizations, writers, and artists; I was amazed at the passion and creativity of fans like me, which I had never seen in person. I attended panels about misogyny in gaming and depictions of disability in geek media. I geeked out with dozens of others who were just as nerdy and passionate about these things as me. It was awesome.

I left that first con in awe of female geek culture, and its boundless capacity for critique, transformation, and creation. I didn’t know then how lucky I was that this was my first con experience, and I think it has profoundly shaped the way I view fandom as a positive space for dialog, community, creativity, and especially for women.

Because it’s not always that way.