Four years ago, I sat next to my father as we watched a new Star Wars film, the first in ten years. I grew up watching the films, and they have been so ingrained in my life as the daughter of an OG fan (Yes, Dad, we know you stood in line for six hours in 1977!) that I do not even remember the first time I saw the original trilogy (it is likely that my first word was an impression of a Wookiee roar). Tonight, I sat next to my father again as we watched what may very well be the last new Star Wars film that we will see together, and, to be quite honest, I don’t know how I feel about it.

I have done my best to keep this review as spoiler-free as possible, however, some plot points are integral to my response to the film. All potential spoiler will be tagged with **. Ye be warned.

About six months ago, I wrote about one of the biggest problems die-hard Star Wars fans face: what’s the best order in which to view the Star Wars films? To recap: I’m the child of one of the OG fans (one who proudly boasts of standing in line for hours in 1977), and now that there are ten–soon to be eleven–films, what I once knew to be true (OG trilogy then the prequels aka by order of release) no longer applies.

I grew up watching Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood. Many of you probably did the same. To many children growing up in the United States–and now, thanks to the internet, around the world–Mr. Rogers was a friend who taught us some very important life lessons. A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood seeks to show us that everyone–even us grown-ups–can benefit from the life lessons of Mr. Rogers in a world as divided as the one in which we currently live. Spoilers will be marked by **. 

“ALL OF US, AT SOME TIME OR OTHER, NEED HELP. WHETHER WE’RE GIVING OR RECEIVING HELP, EACH ONE OF US HAS SOMETHING VALUABLE TO BRING TO THIS WORLD. THAT’S ONE OF THE THINGS THAT CONNECTS US AS NEIGHBORS—IN OUR OWN WAY, EACH ONE OF US IS A GIVER AND A RECEIVER.” -Fred Rogers

A year ago, I was living my best life on holiday in New Zealand. I have missed that country every day since my return to the States, and have been not-so-secretly plotting my (permanent) return to the country I fell deeply in love with.

Until then, I’ll settle for watching films set in New Zealand, and/or written by or starring Kiwis. I want you to fall in love with this country as much as I have, and to celebrate the talented filmmakers from there. So, without further ado, let’s talk film.

The Monday after San Diego Comic Con is always the most tired I am all year, If you’re exhausted today, or maybe just feeling a little run down or out of sorts, then please take a moment to reflect on these quotes from Mr. Rogers:

“If you could only sense how important you are to the lives of those you meet; how important you can be to the people you may never even dream of.”

By The Collectress

Remakes and sequels seem to be the theme of the summer movie season, and studios are counting on recognizable franchises, and stars, to bring in the dollars from all the kids on summer break.

Men In Black: International is the first of [too] many sequels or reboots this summer, and, well, aside from the star power, it’s, um…got a cute alien?

I don’t remember the first time I watched Star Wars: A New Hope. I must have been five or six years old, and I was almost definitely shown the film by my father while my mother was out of the house. It started a lifelong passion for space operas, lightsabers, and princesses who don’t need rescuing. My father, one of the original Star Wars fanboys (he’s very proud that he stood in line for hours back in 1977 to see Ep IV), even allowed my brothers and I to ditch school one day in order to see a rerelease of the original trilogy in cinemas.

Long story short: I grew up on Star Wars, and if there’s one thing my father taught me when The Phantom Menace was released in 1999, it was that the Originals were always meant to be watched before the prequels. Boom. End of discussion.