I have done my best to make this review spoiler-free, and will mark potentially significant spoilers with **.

Well, fam, after Avengers: Endgame, I didn’t know if Marvel could keep me interested in the MCU. My love of Iron Man (and RDJ) was a driving force in my investment in the universe, the primary question that ‘Far From Home’ seeks to answer as the world (both the fictional and literal) seeks to move on from the universe-changing events in Endgame is, well, now that Tony Stark is gone, who is going to be the next Iron Man?

What do we do now that our favs are gone?

By The Collectress

Remakes and sequels seem to be the theme of the summer movie season, and studios are counting on recognizable franchises, and stars, to bring in the dollars from all the kids on summer break.

Men In Black: International is the first of [too] many sequels or reboots this summer, and, well, aside from the star power, it’s, um…got a cute alien?

It seems to be en vogue to make a biopic about a rockstar struggling with identity and fame. (Even more so if the rockstar wore a lot of sequins and took a lot of drugs…but then, what rockstar in the early 70s didn’t?)

Following the success of last year’s Bohemian Rhapsody, director Dexter Fletcher (who took over the Queen biopic after Bryan Singer was fired) helms this film that is part musical, part biography, and part fantasy. It follows John from childhood until the 1980s, through some of the most turbulent moments of his life, and does not shy away from depicting the highs and lows of his career. Behind the glitter and the spectacle is a very honest approach to the storytelling.

Rocketman is more than just the story of a rockstar’s rise to fame; it’s the love story of Elton John. 

Most of the Collective crew and I consider ourselves devout Tolkienites, and when a panel and a screening of the Tolkien film was announced at WonderCon, we made sure to wear our finest Elf attire to the event. We were fortunate enough to speak with director Dome Karukoski after the screening (during which he complimented our cosplays, but that’s neither nor there). Shortly after WonderCon, we were invited via a friend to attend the Los Angeles premiere on May 8.

Seeing the film for a second time proved that it is just as heartwarming and tender as it was when we first saw it last month. Tolkien is a film meant for his fans: it paints a picture of a young man whose imagination was strengthened and nurtured by the fellowship and love of the people surrounding him in his youth.

By The Collectress

I have done my best to keep this spoiler-free (and it wasn’t easy, believe me), and will tag any potential spoilers with**. 

I don’t really know what to say about this film, the closing act of a story arc that has captivated us for eleven years. In 2008, before Disney bought Marvel, before superhero swag was omnipresent in stores, before most of us knew what a “Mjolnir” was, Marvel took a risk, and produced its first self-financed film: Ironman. 

11 years and 21 films later, the same studio, now backed by Disney, has brought us the finale to the story that began with just Tony Stark in a cave, a bucket of tools, and an idea.

Iron Man (2008)
Robert Downey Jr

Last year, when I wrote my review of ‘Infinity War’, I wondered if the payoff in the fourth Avengers movie would be worth the wait. I also described Infinity War as ‘the most ambitious superhero movie ever made’, and, well, if Infinity War was ten years of ambition, Endgame is the culmination of that ambition.