lscc

The international members of the Collective team were able to attend London Super Comic Con over the weekend of March 14 and 15, flaunting our very first press badge. LSCC primarily revolves around comic books, as opposed to film or television adaptations and franchises, and was a refreshing look at the European nerd community. As at any major convention, the costuming was top notch. Two of the main events at this year’s LSCC were the Open Masquerade and the Costume Championship. One of the judges in attendance was the flawless Yaya Han (pictured in the gallery below, posing in the Syfy Fan Cam booth), who is even more beautiful in person.

The Costume Championship displayed the best of the best cosplay, taking performance into account. The grand winner was RossECobb Cosplay for his broadway-style Ursula. Check out his costume, as well as the other fabulous cosplays featured below, such as That Cosplay Couple‘s Joker and Harley Quinn.

It’s that time of year again, friends, when we start to scrape together funds to attend fan conventions in the new year. In 2014, I gave you 5 California conventions I was dying to attend, and even got the chance to go to a few. In 2015, I am expanding my horizons and sharing with you 5 fan conventions across the United States that are well worth the travel. When it comes to attending fan conventions, the sooner you know what you’re looking for, the better. It’s best to think of fees such as hotel, transportation, cosplay and food as well as entrance cost and spending cash before the actual date, so as to get a head start on purchasing items in advance and not shock your wallet too badly.

If you’re interested in attending one of the cons on the list below, click on the links, visit the pages and book your time NOW, before tickets are gone. Enjoy!

xoxo The Collectiva Diva

Follow me on Twitter @collectivadiva or Tumblr and dive into the fandom rabbit hole with me.

Dragon Con

 

What: The largest multi-media, popular culture convention focusing on science fiction & fantasy, gaming, comics, literature, art, music, and film in the universe.

When: September 4-7, 2015

Where: Atlanta, GA

How Much: $100 for Dragon Con Membership

photo cr: Twitter/@mishacollins
photo cr: Twitter/@mishacollins

The 2014 Burbank Supernatural Convention has come and gone, but the memories will live forever on Tumblr, Twitter and YouTube. If you attended BurCon this weekend, you might have seen us on Saturday, Team Free Will–with one foxy mama in a trench coat, a prancing moose, a blonde bombshell version of femme!Bobby and me, a femme!Dean not afraid to let the world know that “I Wuv Cas”. We wandered the Burbank Marriott convention center and lobby from 9am-midnight, enjoying the sights, meeting new friends and generally fangirling over all the amazing stars in attendance that day. Wanna know my top 5 moments? Here they are, in no particular order.

1) Meeting the Collective fans

This year, the Collective Bloggers decided we wanted to meet you. We put out the call on Twitter, posted a reminder last week and brought a pie and plastic forks and 3 rounds (yes, I said 3) of Supernatural trivia to keep us entertained and then got to hang out! It was so great to meet some of our readers and share our mutual love of Supernatural, cold beer and apple pie IRL, I think we should probably plan to do it again. Kudos to the Collectress, who kicked ass as Cas and won the trivia game, beating out @castielsarmy by a mere 2 points.

 

geek girl con

Guest Post by Jessica Mason

 

Pros and Cons

Fan conventions are funny things: they look different from inside. It’s actually much easier as an outsider observer to notice trends and take in everything about a con. For instance, I felt like I knew much less about all the panels at SDCC 2014 because I was too busy racing through the San Diego Convention Center and surrounding climes to keep up with Twitter and Tumblr and all the news that was emerging. In a way, that’s what can make a con fun. You are completely enclosed in your little world. There are usually too many people taking up bandwidth to make actually readings tweets and tumblr feasible, and the reception is always crappy, so you get to exist in this nice bubble. You hang out with your fellow fans, make friends, stand in long lines, forget to eat, squee and generally enjoy your time fangirling. And that was to some extent my experience at Geek Girl Con 2014 in Seattle over the 11th and 12th of October, except the real world’s very ugly head kept finding ways to butt in.

In the past, the Collective blog has addressed issues such as nerd privilege and the way that sometimes being in a fandom can hurt us. Today, however, I’m presenting an issue that extends to every user of the Internet: cyberbullying.

This is not something that only affects teens. This is not only the title of an ABC Family movie. This is not a myth.

Cyberbullying—sometimes known as cyberharassment or cyberstalking—carries much of the same definition as traditional bullying. Dan Olweus, a Norwegian researcher who is recognised as the leading scholar on bullying, defines cyberbullying as “bullying performed via electronic means such as mobile/cellphones or the internet” (1). ‘Traditional’ bullying, he defines as “using three components: (1) aggressive behavior with negative actions, (2) a pattern of behavior over time, and (3) an imbalance of power or strength” (2). We most frequently associate these actions with children and adolescents, but this is not always the case.

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Guest Post by Jessica Mason

There’s a moment, I think all of us self-identified geeks know it, when you walk into your first con and think: I have finally found my people. Where once you existed in isolation, able to share your passions with a few anonymous faces on line, suddenly you’re among other, actual, living, breathing, nerds. The thing about you that had to be hidden – your nerdiness – is something that is shared with this mass of people and celebrated. The only thing comparable I can think of was my first time stepping into a gay pride festival, fresh off of coming out. It was so welcoming and so much fun, and I was indeed suddenly so proud to be myself. Cons are like that. The moment when you’re walking down the street and see the first person dressed as Poison Ivy adjusting their bodice or Darth Vader in the coffee shop, and you know it: you’re home.

I felt that moment profoundly the first time I attended Geek Girl Con in Seattle in August of 2012. GGC was in its second year, just getting its feet wet, and it was still an amazing experience. As I roamed the aisles full of crocheted Avengers, independent game developers, geek community organizations, writers, and artists; I was amazed at the passion and creativity of fans like me, which I had never seen in person. I attended panels about misogyny in gaming and depictions of disability in geek media. I geeked out with dozens of others who were just as nerdy and passionate about these things as me. It was awesome.

I left that first con in awe of female geek culture, and its boundless capacity for critique, transformation, and creation. I didn’t know then how lucky I was that this was my first con experience, and I think it has profoundly shaped the way I view fandom as a positive space for dialog, community, creativity, and especially for women.

Because it’s not always that way.

I’m not a morning person, and after a hefty dose of Benadryl, I’m the Walking Dead.  Apparently all it takes is a WonderCon badge to make me a morning person.  Now, as the Collectiva Diva has detailed, we did a group cosplay as the Lady Avengers. Diva was a Lady Captain America, and I, well, I poured myself into a PVC bodysuit and thigh holsters. Two guesses as to who I was.

https://twitter.com/dearcollectress/status/457561203473002496

But more on cosplay later.

We arrived at the Anaheim Convention Center before 9 a.m. and after a weapons check (Tasha don’t mess around), we were in line for the arena for the Warner Bros and Twentieth Century Fox presentations. We didn’t know exactly what we were waiting to see, but we were pretty damn excited about it. That’s a lie. I knew Richard Armitage was going to be in the building, and I was sure as f**k excited about that.

image

 

Mr. Armitage was there to promote his new film “Into the Storm,” a natural disaster fic set in small town America and costarring Sarah Wayne  Callies (“Laurie” from TWD). He obligingly answered a few questions about his role as Thorin Oakenshield in The Hobbit, however, and the arena went crazy for it. He’s a polite and professional convention attendee, and that’s one thing I can cross off my bucket list: see an actor from LotR or The Hobbit. 

But wait.

The very next panel was for Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, starring Gary Oldman, Keri Russell, and ANDY SERKIS. Okay, breathe, I told myself. So what if you’ve seen two actors from Middle-earth in the span of 30 minutes? That’s just one more thing to cross off of the bucket list.

WonderCon, Anaheim Convention Center, April 18-20, 2014

The Collective bloggers have been working our asses off recently, at our day jobs, fangirling here at acollectivemind.com, and preparing a brilliant femme!Avengers group cosplay for our most recent endeavor, WonderCon 2014.

https://twitter.com/nerdwrldprblms/status/457913533242433536

 

If you follow @Nerdwrldprblms on Twitter, then you might have seen some of the pictures from our Saturday at SoCal’s spring kick-off comic convention or followed our tweets as we sat through presentations by Warner Brothers, Fox Films, Marvel Now, Showrunners, Legends, The OneRing.net and saw sneak previews of films such as Godzilla, How To Train Your Dragon, Into The Storm, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes and more. There was so much to see and plenty to discuss, so The Collectress and I have decided to split our “best of” moments into two separate posts, one written by each of us. I’m lucky enough to start us off with my top 3 moments of WonderCon 2014.

3) Showrunners

 

This top 3 moment came as a surprise to me. I had never heard of this film, but after sitting through the panel, I’m fascinated by the idea of a documentary which explores the jobs of those who create and run popular television shows today. The project was originally funded on Kickstarter, and so it seems to be a labor of love to those involved. The pleasant surprise came when Chris Carter–X-Files showrunner, and Andrew Kreisenberg–Arrow showrunner, happened to sit on this panel, both of whom have created unique and engaging television shows that I love. I have been a fan of X-Files since I was a teen watching it on Fox, Friday nights at 9pm with my mom, and thus, Chris Carter’s work. The writer admitted he hasn’t written much past the pilot for The After (watch S01xE01 here) a new web series which premiered in February on Amazon TV, but has hopes for what the show might become. Click the link above to check out the show for free on Amazon.com.

Also in attendance was Andrew Kreisenberg, the showrunner of one of my new favorite television shows, Arrow on the CW. I’m just going to get down to business and say yes, I did tweet about Olicity yesterday and yes, Kreisenberg seemed to be hinting at the legitimacy of that particular ship when he said that fans should just be patient for relationships between characters to develop and not tweet wank to him about the show. Basically. The writer and producer also discussed the imminent Flash series and all the fun they are having creating these comic book series that fans, producers and even the network president, seem to love.

Kreisenberg also talked about the John Barrowman and his the role of Malcolm Merlin, stating that all the “hero” baggage the actor brought from the role of Captain Jack Harkness (from Doctor Who, you dolt), gave the villain role depth and went against the normal fan perceptions of the actor. I couldn’t agree more.