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This article contains spoilers for the film, so be warned…

This weekend, the highly anticipated biopic, Straight Outta Compton, opened in theatres to audiences everywhere and made almost $25M on opening night, alone. The film tells the story of rap group N.W.A., members Easy-E, Dr. Dre, Ice Cube, MC Ren and DJ Yella, and their rise to fame in the 1980s. While their first album, “Straight Outta Compton” (1988) was a bit before my time, I made up for it by bumping it during high school in the 90s. Although I grew up in Los Angeles, I’m a prep school brat and was born and raised in the suburbs, only passing Compton on the freeway on my way to the beach or the airport. In my youth, the music of N.W.A. represented a culture I didn’t feel I necessarily belonged to, but wanted to understand. As a young person intrigued by the musical revolution of the 1960s, gangsta rap represented an unexpected cultural commentary that coincided with my teen angst perfectly. For my generation,  N.W.A.’s “Fuck Tha Police” is as controversial as John Lennon’s “Imagine” was to my mother’s and just as meaningful.

The Mutineer and I are a bit obsessed with the theatre. We’re starving students, and the theatre is cheaper than the cinema (sometimes), so what are a couple of fangirls to do on a Saturday night? We’ve been traipsing about the West End quite frequently of late for, um, writing research. So here’s a few shows to hit up the next time you’re in London or it comes to your city.

The Book of Mormon

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This is, hands down, the funniest play I’ve ever seen. It’s irreverent, sacrilegious, and guaranteed to offend somebody.

The creators of South Park bring us the story of Elder Price, a young Mormon boy who is about to leave on his two year mission for the Church. He hopes to be sent to Orlando, but is sent to northern Uganda instead, accompanied by the overeager Elder Cunningham. What follows is a crisis of face, and the most interesting retelling of the book of Mormon that you’ll ever hear. I guarantee it.

I found this play to be so damned blasphemous, that I saw it twice. You can see it at the Prince of Wales theatre.