We Deserve a Film About Young Leia Organa

By The Collectress

If you’ve been anywhere near my social media lately, you may have noticed that even after almost two years, I’m still incredibly saddened by Carrie Fisher‘s unfortunate passing. I deeply miss our Space Mom, and while The Last Jedi had some incredible moments for Leia, I cannot help but want more of the rebel leader.

The new Star Wars film is due out in a few weeks, and I’m finding it hard to be excited. Han Solo is an interesting and dynamic character, sure, but does he really need a trilogy of his own? As much as I swoon over Harrison Ford (yes, he’s still got it), I don’t really mind the new actor (whatever his name is) and I love Han, I can still think of one person who deserves this film so. much. more.

For those of you who follow me on Twitter, what you’re about to read may be slightly repetitive. For those of you who don’t…if you’re not a Leia fan, you’re in the wrong place.

Let’s review what we know about Leia: after the death of her mother, she was adopted by Bail Organa and Queen Breha of Alderaan, eventually taking her adopted father’s place in the Senate of the Republic, and (presumably secretly) becoming a leading member of the Rebellion against the Empire. She is a key strategist for the Rebellion’s forces, an experienced diplomat, and an accomplished leader. Oh, she also knows how to defend herself in combat (she is trained in martial arts and can use a blaster), speaks multiple languages, and withstands torture from the Empire.

Oh, and she’s Force sensitive, but perhaps that is the least of her many impressive qualities.

If that doesn’t clue you in to how friggin interesting Leia’s early life was, here it is in plainer language: she became a Senator at eighteen and a leader of the Rebellion at nineteen. For perspective, at nineteen, I was attending house parties, eating Cheetos, and watching my friends get high.  I was definitely not out organizing a rebellion against the greatest evil in the galaxy, and I definitely did not have the maturity to engage in politics. Leia, however, manages both, and she manages to encourage and command the respect of those that follow her. At the age of nineteen. 

In fact I can think of very few people throughout history who have become so accomplished and inspired such loyalty at that young of an age. Leia is pretty much the Alexander Hamilton of Star Wars, and for that alone she deserves her own film.

So, The Powers That Be, here’s a potential film for you, one that I would watch over and over and over and over: show me fifteen year old Leia, learning martial arts. Show me sixteen year old Leia, learning diplomacy from her mother. Show me seventeen year old Leia, learning from her adopted father about politics. Show me an optimistic eighteen year old Leia, becoming a Senator because she believed she could change the world. Show me a nineteen year old Leia, recognising that the Empire is the biggest threat to the galaxy and forming the rebellion.

Show me how Leia became more than a princess. Show me how she became a rebel. 

So, yes, young smuggler Han Solo will be an interesting film to watch, and I am sure that I will enjoy it. But, personally, I’d rather watch Billie Lourd (Carrie Fisher’s daughter) put on the senatorial gown and prove to the galaxy that Leia’s legacy is not a metal bikini, but an incredibly keen mind and the ability to inspire those around her to take action even when the odds are not in their favor.

And, regarding that stupid bikini, here are the words of Carrie herself:

That’s our general.


Continually having emotions about Star Wars and Carrie Fisher over on Twitter. 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply! (Please be advised that all comments are moderated)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s